Skip to main content

洛杉矶朋美房地産工作室, 祝各位朋友健康快樂!阖家平安!幸福美滿!

感謝各界朋友的支持和肯定! 在南加賣房子、買房子、房地産投資,申請房屋貸款或重貸,請聯繫我們。紮根洛杉磯各大社區,竭誠爲您服務! Selling or Buying Properties? Mortgages or Home Loans? We are here to help! Call Now: 626-723-3278 or Email: Services@PM-Realty.com;

Home
中文主頁
Sell Your House
Our Home Search
Home for Rent
Before an Offer
Loans & Refinancing
Closing Cost
More Information
Tax Savings Programs
Probate FAQ
Living Trust FAQ
Rental Property
School Districts
Contact Us
Site Map
Member Login
 
Living Trust FAQ
 
 
A: A trust is an arrangement under which one person, called a trustee, holds legal title to property for another person, called a beneficiary. You can be the trustee of your own living trust, keeping full control over all property held in trust.

 

A "living trust" (also called an "inter vivos" trust) is simply a trust you create while you're alive, rather than one that is created at your death.

 

Different kinds of living trusts can help you avoid probate, reduce estate taxes, or set up long-term property management.

 


Q: Why should I make a living trust?
 
A: The big advantage to making a living trust is that property left through the trust doesn't have to go through probate court. In a nutshell, probate is the court-supervised process of paying your debts and distributing your property to the people who inherit it.

 

The average probate drags on for months before the inheritors get anything. And by that time, there's less for them to get: In many cases, about 5% of the property has been eaten up by lawyer and court fees.

 

Still, not everyone has to worry about probate, and some people don't need a living trust at all.

 


Q: How does a living trust avoid probate?
 
A: Property you transfer into a living trust before your death doesn't go through probate. The successor trustee -- the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death -- simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. In many cases, the whole process takes only a few weeks, and there are no lawyer or court fees to pay. When all of the property has been transferred to the beneficiaries, the living trust ceases to exist.
 

Most people want to leave as much of their money to their children, or other heirs, as possible -- and want to avoid a big chunk of that money going to probate lawyers. That's where living trusts come in -- they can eliminate the need for probate and probate fees.

 

Probate involves inventorying and appraising the property, paying debts and taxes, and distributing the remainder of the property according to the will. When you make a living trust, your surviving family members can transfer your property quickly and easily, without probate. More of the property you leave goes to the people you want to inherit it.

 

A basic living trust allows property to avoid probate and to quickly and efficiently pass to the beneficiaries you name, without the hassles and expense of probate court proceedings. A married couple can use one basic living trust to handle both co-owned property and separate property.

 
Consult your lawer about how to creat a living trust.